My favorite westerns, Mike Baron

MY FAVORITE WESTERNS

In the interest of comity, I shall not call this the Ten Greatest Westerns. This is simply a list of my favorite Westerns, in no particular order.

THE WILD BUNCH—Sam Peckinpah’s violent elegy to the closing of the West is filled with indelible images and lines, and provided career-defining roles for Ernest Borgnine, William Holden, Robert Ryan, Warren Oates, Edmund O’Brien and Ben Johnson, and launched the career of Bo Hopkins. A bittersweet drama of aging outlaws with no place to go.

THE MAN WHO SHOT LIBERTY VALANCE—my favorite Ford, with the Duke as an aging gunfighter who comes to the aid of naive lawyer Jimmy Stewart. Lee Marvin at his most despicable.

SHANE—the legend of the lone gunfighter has never been better, with Alan Ladd in his finest role, and Jack Palance, every bit as despicable as Lee Marvin.

THE PROFESSIONALS—Lee Marvin, Burt Lancaster, Robert Ryan and Woody Strode saddle up to rescue kidnapped bridge Claudia Cardinale from Mexican outlaw Jack Palance but—surprise! She doesn’t want to be rescued. Filled with exciting set pieces and crackling dialogue, a Richard Brooks masterpiece. Brooks also did Bite The Bullet.

RIDE THE HIGH COUNTRY—Peckinpah’s first feature is a romantic ode to the dying west, with career-capping performances from Randolph Scott and Joel McCrea. Introduced Warren Oates. Begins with a camel race.

HOMBRE—Paul Newman as a blue-eyed Indian comes to the aid of ungrateful banker Fredric March, menaced by the sinister but likable Richard Boone. Why did Richard Boone, Jack Palance, and Lee Marvin never make a Western together?

RED RIVER—the Duke as a rigid father figure intent on a cattle drive, dealing with rebellious adopted son Montgomery Clift. Colleen Grey finally straightens them out.

UNFORGIVEN—Clint Eastwood’s last Western is a sprawling revisionist epic where the West is not so glamorous, nor the heroes so heroic. His aging gunfighter, Will Munny, does what he must, leading to a showdown with brutal sheriff Gene Hackman. It always bothered me that Munny simply abandoned his children in order to provide for them.

TRUE GRIT—both versions are brilliant.

VALDEZ IS COMING—Burt Lancaster as Mexican lawman Bob Valdez fights the system to bring justice for the widow of a man wrongly killed. Based on an Elmore Leonard story, this is hortatory story telling at its finest.

ULZANA’S RAID—Burt Lancaster again as a wizened scout trying to tell a naive young Army lieutenant about the Apaches’ true nature. But will that lieutenant listen? No he won’t. He has to learn the hard way.