On Writing

ON WRITING

 

            Writers are people who have to write.  They write every day.  They don’t talk about it, they do it.  People who don’t write every day are not serious writers.  All right.  Five days a week, minimum. This is about writing comic books, but it applies to all fiction. 

 

            You must know your craft, the rules of grammar, how to conjugate a verb.  Don’t get nervous. Most of you already know this without the fancy labels.  I see, you see, he sees.    It is part of your instinctive grasp of English.  Everyone needs a little book of rules.  For the writer, it is Elements of Style by Strunk and White.  This slim volume has been in continuous publication since 1935.  It takes an hour to read and is quite droll.  Buy a used copy.  Do not get the illustrated version.  It has been bowdlerized in the name of pc. 

 

            All good fiction, whether comics or otherwise, is built around character.  We humans are mostly interested in our own kind.  The more interesting your protagonist, the better your story. Stories start with people.  The TV show House on Fox is a perfect example.  Hugh Laurie’s character is so thorny and unpredictable people tune in week after week out of fascination with his personality. Same thing with Batman, since Denny O’Neil straightened him out.  Prior to O’Neil, Batman wandered from mood to mood, often “humorous,” seldom entertaining.  Denny made Batman a self-righteous obsessive/compulsive.  Obsession is always interesting. 

 

            While it’s possible to grow a great story out of pure plot, sooner or later it will hinge on the characters of your protagonists.  “Character is destiny” holds true in fiction as well as life.  Know who your characters are before you start writing.  Some writers construct elaborate histories for each character before they begin.  It is not a bad idea.  Start with people then add the plot.  Get a bulletin board.  Write each character’s name and salient characteristics on a 3 X 5 card and tack it to the bulletin board.  You can do the same with plot points.  You can move characters and plot points around to alter your chronology. 

 

            What is plot?  It’s a dynamic narrative with a beginning, middle, and end.  It’s like a good pop song.  It has to have a hook.  Sometimes that hook is simply the narrator’s voice.  Huckleberry Finnsucceeds mostly on the strength of Huck’s voice, by which I mean the way he presents words.  In other words, it’s not the meat, it’s the motion.  It’s not what you say, it’s the way that you say it.  Huck comes alive through his words, which are fresh and immediate.  We feel we know Huck.  Same thing with Raymond Chandler’s Philip Marlowe.  It’s that world-weary, cynical with a heart-of-gold voice whispering in your ear.  He looked about as inconspicuous as a tarantula on a slice of angel food. Chandler also said, “A good story cannot be devised, it has to be distilled.”  In other words, start with character and let character find the plot.

 

            Comic writers think visually.  No matter how bad our chops we can pretty much describe what we see in words.  Some of us can even draw a little bit.  I used to write comics by drawing every page out by hand—everything—all the tiny details, facial expressions, warped anatomy, half-assed perspective, all word balloons and captions.  Editors and artists loved it.  Why?  Because they had everything they needed on one page instead of spread across three pages of single-spaced type.  Some of the most successful writers in the industry write very densely.  Each script is a phone book. 

 

            While drawing I became so immersed in the story I gave myself a spastic rhomboid muscle. Friends!  Do not do what I did!  Learn to draw properly.  That means a drawing board, an ergonomically correct chair, and applying the pencil lightly to the paper.  So much for art advice.

 

            There is another advantage for writers who would draw each page.  It forces you to confront issues of pacing, camera placement, and editing.  It teaches you the natural pace of a story, when to break a scene, when to zoom in for a close-up, and when to pull way back for a two-page spread. Archie Goodwin and Harvey Kurtzman both used this method when writing comics for other artists. I’m not advocating such.  Most of the best writers in this industry do not draw.  If they do, they still write full script. 

 

            Even though you are only providing words, it is up to you to SHOW, DON’T TELL.  This is the prime directive.  What’s the dif?  Tell:  “The assassin drew a bead on Mac’s back and pulled the trigger.”

 

            Show:  “Mac stared at the wall.  He was still staring when a thirty foot giant slammed him in the back with a titanium driver.  A creeping numbness radiated from his right shoulder followed by the gush of warm blood and the scent of sheared copper.”  We don’t have to mention the assassin because obviously someone pulled the trigger.

 

            When writing for comics, try to show as much as possible.  A finicky man entering a public phone booth might pull out a handkerchief to wipe the receiver.  Maybe he’s obsessive/compulsive. Maybe he carries a box of Sani-wipes with him everywhere.  By showing this man wiping down the receiver, you have established something about his character. 

 

            Never describe what the reader can see for himself. 

 

            There’s no established format for comic scripts.  You can’t go wrong by doing it as a film script.  You don’t necessarily need a screenplay writing program, just write it like a play.  What does a play look like?  Brush up your Shakespeare.  There are a lot of books out there on writing comics.  I’ve contributed to some of them.  It never hurts to read about writing.  We’re all curious as to how other writers do it.  Many aspiring writers have recommended Robert McKee’s Story as the way to go. While Story contains good advice, it is also egregiously padded and never uses a nickel when a fifty cent piece will do.  Joe Esterhaz’ The Devil’s Guide to Hollywood is the anti-Story.  If you read one, you must read the other.

 

            There’s also Denny’s DC Comic’ Guide to Writing Comics, a no bullshit primer by one of the best.

 

            There are no writing schools but there are many writing programs.  College level courses on comic book writing are a bull market.  I’d advise any struggling writer with a Master’s degree to head toward the local college.  Run don’t walk.  Nobody can teach you how to write.  You either got it or you ain’t.  But a good teacher can help you improve your writing.  Famous novelists in residence offer a career shortcut to those who are determined to become novelists or screenwriters.  Same old adage, it’s not what you know, it’s who you know.

 

            James Hudnall has an essay on writing that comes and goes on James’ homepage like a mirage.  Go to www.hameshudnall.com and say James, where’s that great column on writing at? Elmore Leonard has a few choice words on writing:

http://www.elmoreleonard.com/index.php?/weblog/more/elmore_leonards_ten_rules_of_writing/

 



 

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